Tag Archives: obesity

Care of women with obesity in pregnancy. RCOG green‐top guideline No.72 in BJOG

This RCOG guideline recommends that women who are obese should be supported to lose weight before conception and between pregnancies to ensure the healthiest possible outcome for mother and baby. This is the second edition of this guideline. The first edition was published in 2010 as a joint guideline with the Centre of Maternal and Child Enquiries under the title ‘Management of Women with Obesity in Pregnancy’.

RCOG previously co-developed a new digital tool, Planning for Pregnancy, which provides tailored information for women on how they can prepare before conception in order to have a healthy pregnancy.

See the RCOG Press release here RCM press release here

View the RCOG Greentop Care of Women with Obesity in Pregnancy here

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Eating for two’ pregnancy myth

Pregnant woman wikimedia
Image source: Wikimedia

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) has highlighted the publication of a survey, to understand women’s perceptions of how much they should eat during pregnancy.  The survey, commissioned by the National Charity Partnership,, found 69 per cent of women are unaware of how many extra calories they need to consume during pregnancy. The RCOG is working with the National Charity Partnership to bust the ’eating for two’ myth and make it easier for people to understand how to make healthy choices during pregnancy to avoid unhealthy weight gain.

Read the RCOG news article here 

Access healthy eating information linked to this campaign here

Improving health for pregnancy

better-beginnings
Image Source: NIHR

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) has published Better Beginnings: improving health for pregnancy.  This themed review brings together NIHR research on different aspects of health before, during and after pregnancy.  It covers smoking, healthy diet and weight, alcohol and drugs, mental health, violence against women, and supporting families using multifaceted approaches. It is aimed at healthcare professionals working with women around the time of pregnancy as well as those with a wider interest in women’s and children’s health including commissioners.

To read the full review click here