Tag Archives: RCOG

Surgical Management of Miscarriage and Removal of Persistent Placental or Fetal Remains (Consent Advice No. 10 – Joint with AEPU)

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Image Source: NHS Photo Library

This is the second edition of this guidance which was previously published in June 2010 under the title Surgical Evacuation of the Uterus for Early Pregnancy Loss.

This paper provides advice for health professionals obtaining consent from women undergoing surgical management of miscarriage with electric or manual vacuum aspiration. It is also intended to be appropriate when surgical intervention is indicated for an incomplete termination of pregnancy, incomplete or delayed miscarriage, or partially retained placenta after delivery. After careful discussion with the woman, the consent form should be edited under the heading ‘Name of proposed procedure or course of treatment’ to accurately describe the exact procedure to be performed.

Download the full guidance here

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Multiple pregnancies following assisted conception. Scientific impact paper No. 22

RCOG Scientific impact paper 22

This is the second edition of this paper, first published in January 2011 under the same title.

Maternal complications include increased risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes, peripartum haemorrhage, operative delivery, postpartum depression, and heightened symptoms of anxiety and parenting stress. Multiple pregnancy is also associated with a six-fold increase in the risk of preterm birth, which is a leading cause of infant mortality and long-term mental and physical disabilities, including cerebral palsy, learning difficulties and chronic lung disease.

This paper describes current knowledge and progress made since the publication of the previous edition to reduce multiple pregnancies following ART in the UK, with reference to more recent data showing a downward trend.

Download the paper in pdf from RCOG here

View the BJOG paper here

Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in pregnancy

GBS
Image Source: RCOG

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has published a new patient information leaflet Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in pregnancy and newborn babies. This leaflet provides advice for women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant about Group B Streptococcus infection in newborn babies.

Download the leaflet here

Audio and large print versions are also available at the same link.

Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Update on Treatment (Scientific Impact Paper No. 56)

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Image Source: NHS Photolibrary

Cytomegalovirus (CMV), a member of the human herpesvirus family, is the most common viral cause of congenital infection, affecting 0.2–2.2% of all live births. It is responsible for significant morbidity, especially in infants who are symptomatic in the neonatal period. It is the leading non-genetic cause of sensorineural hearing loss and a major cause of neurological disability. Around 10–15% of neonates with congenital CMV will be symptomatic at birth, with a similar percentage developing problems later in childhood.

This Scientific Impact Paper summarises the issues around screening, diagnosis and treatment of CMV in pregnancy, utilising the best available evidence and highlighting recent advances.

Read the full Scientific Impact Paper here 

Khalil AHeath PJones CSoe AVille YG on behalf of the Royal College of Obstetricians and GynaecologistsCongenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Update on Treatment. Scientific Impact Paper No. 56BJOG 2017; DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.14836.

Each baby counts

Every baby counts

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has published Each Baby Counts 2015. Each Baby Counts is the RCOG’s national quality improvement programme to reduce the number of babies who die or are left severely disabled as a result of incidents occurring during term labour. The report presents key findings and recommendations based on the analysis of complete data relating to term stillbirths, neonatal deaths and babies with brain injuries born during 2015, the first full year of the programme.

Read the full report here

Group B streptococcal disease RCOG Greentop No 36 updated

AGAR dish

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has updated Group B Streptococcal Disease, Early-onset (Green-top Guideline No 36).  This guideline guidance for obstetricians, midwives and neonatologists on the prevention of early-onset (less than 7 days of age) neonatal group B streptococcal (EOGBS) disease.

GBS is recognised as the most frequent cause of severe early-onset infection in newborn infants. GBS is present in the bowel flora of 20–40% of adults (colonisation) and those who are colonised are called ‘carriers’. This includes pregnant women. There is variation in practice across the UK regarding the best strategies to prevent EOGBS disease.

Download the full guideline here

Eating for two’ pregnancy myth

Pregnant woman wikimedia
Image source: Wikimedia

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) has highlighted the publication of a survey, to understand women’s perceptions of how much they should eat during pregnancy.  The survey, commissioned by the National Charity Partnership,, found 69 per cent of women are unaware of how many extra calories they need to consume during pregnancy. The RCOG is working with the National Charity Partnership to bust the ’eating for two’ myth and make it easier for people to understand how to make healthy choices during pregnancy to avoid unhealthy weight gain.

Read the RCOG news article here 

Access healthy eating information linked to this campaign here