Tag Archives: statistics

Breastfeeding at 6 to 8 weeks after birth

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NHS maternity statistics, England 2016 to 2017

For the first time these statistics from NHS Digital will combine reporting from two data sources for maternity information – Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and Maternity Services Data Set (MSDS) – to give a fuller picture of NHS maternity activity for deliveries in 2016/17. This publication was previously named Hospital Maternity Activity.

Key Facts

HES data
• There were 636,401 deliveries in NHS hospitals during 2016-17, a decrease of 1.8 per cent from 2015-16.
• The proportion of deliveries with a spontaneous onset of labour has decreased from 68.7 per cent in 2006-07 to 55.1 per cent in 2016-17.
• The proportion of deliveries where labour was induced has increased from 20.3 per cent in 2006-07 to 29.4 per cent in 2016-17.

MSDS data
• In 2016-17, 355,850 deliveries were recorded within the MSDS by 111 maternity service providers.
• 80.0 per cent of women with babies born at 37 weeks gestation or more had skin-to-skin contact within one hour of the birth.
• 11.6 per cent of women with a recorded smoking status at their booking appointment were smokers.

Download  the full statistics  here

Birth characteristics in England and Wales: 2016

nhs_uclh-maternity-newborn-3-11487
Image Source: NHS Photolibrary

Annual birth statistics from the Office for National Statistics, including birthweight, place of birth, multiple births and stillbirths. According to the Royal College of Midwifes (RCM) ONS’ latest figures show that in 2016, the stillbirth rate for England and Wales fell to 4.4 per 1000 total births; the lowest rate since 1992 when it was 4.3.
The data also revealed that the percentage of women having home births in 2016 was 2.1% – a small decrease compared with 2012 to 2015 when it was 2.3%.
Of the 696,271 live births in 2016, 7% (48,490) were low birthweight (under 2.5kg), which has remained the same since 2011.

Read the full statistics here

National Pregnancy In Diabetes Annual Report 2016

NDinP report
Image Source: NHS Digital

The National Pregnancy in Diabetes (NPID) audit is part of the National Diabetes Audit (NDA) programme and is commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) as part of the National Clinical Audit and Patient Outcomes Programme (NCAPOP). The NDA is managed by the NHS Digital in partnership with Diabetes UK and is supported by Public Health England (PHE).

The audit is a measurement system to support improvement in the quality of care for women with diabetes who are pregnant or planning pregnancy and seeks to address the three key questions:

– Were women with diabetes adequately prepared for pregnancy?

– Were adverse maternal outcomes during pregnancy minimised?

– Were adverse fetal/infant outcomes minimised?

This report includes data on women with diabetes with completed pregnancies between 1 January 2016 and 31 December 2016.

Almost one in 10 women with Type 1 diabetes had at least one hospital admission for severe hypoglycaemia.

Download the full report here

Maternity Services Monthly Statistics, England – May 2017

This is a report on NHS-funded maternity services in England for May 2017, using data submitted to the Maternity Services Data Set (MSDS). The MSDS has been developed to help achieve better outcomes of care for mothers, babies and children.

The MSDS is a patient-level ‘secondary uses’ data set that re-uses clinical and operational data for purposes other than direct patient care, such as commissioning and clinical audit. It captures key information at each stage of the maternity service care pathway in NHS-funded maternity services, such as those provided by GP practices and hospitals. The data collected include mother’s demographics, booking appointments, admissions and re-admissions, screening tests, labour and delivery along with baby’s demographics, diagnoses and screening tests.

  • Of the births that had a recorded delivery method, 57 per cent were spontaneous vaginal births, 11 per cent had instrumental assistance, 13 per cent were elective caesarean sections and 15 per cent were emergency caesarean sections. The proportion of births by emergency caesarean was highest in the London Commissioning Region (17 per cent) and lowest in the Midlands and East of England Commissioning Region (14 per cent).

View the statistics here

Under pressure? NHS maternity services in England

Briefing note
Image Source: IFS

The Institute of Fiscal Studies has published “Under pressure? NHS maternity services in England”. This briefing note discusses the causes and consequences of short-run and long-run pressures on NHS maternity services in England.  It finds the number of maternity cases has stabilised since 2010 but the case mix has changed.

  • The changing case mix explains all of the rise in the number of C-sections in England between 2006 and 2014. The number of C-sections performed by NHS hospitals in England each year increased by 23,000 between 2006 and 2014. We estimate that all of this growth can be explained by the changing case mix of mothers giving birth. There is no evidence of a change in medical practice leading to more C-sections.

Read the briefing note here
Download the full document here

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) – April 2017 to June 2017, Experimental Statistics Report

The Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) Enhanced Dataset (SCCI 2026) is an NHS Digital repository for individual level data collected by healthcare providers in England, including acute hospital providers, mental health providers and GP practices.

Key Facts

The Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) Enhanced Dataset (SCCI 2026) supports the Department of Health’s FGM Prevention Programme by presenting a national picture of the prevalence of FGM in England.
•Between April and June 2017 there were 2,288 attendances2 reported at NHS trusts and GP practices where FGM was identified or a procedure for FGM was undertaken.
•There were 1,178 women and girls who had their FGM information collected in the Enhanced Dataset for the first time1. This does not indicate how recently the FGM was undertaken, nor does it necessarily mean that this is the woman or girl’s first attendance for FGM. It is the first time their information has been collected in the FGM Enhanced Dataset.

Download or view the statistics here